Archive for the Goshogawara-city Category

JR EAST PASS SPECIAL

Posted in Aomori-city, Goshogawara-city, Hachinohe-city, Hirosaki-city, Mutsu-city, Shichinohe-town, Towada-city with tags , , on May 23, 2011 by Yuko

This is my first post since the massive earthquake and tsunami hit northern Japan in March 11, 2011. 

Although it’s a part of my job to promote Aomori tourism, honestly I couldn’t really write “Come to Aomori for sightseeing!” while suffering from thousands of tremors in these 2 months. Finally, the earth seems to be calm down and I am glad to resume this blog.

Japan is trying really hard to have our normal lives back. Here is one encouraging example of quick and great restorations! East Japan Railway repaired the seriously damaged facilities and equipment of Tohoku Shinkansen line, and full Shinkansen service between Tokyo and Shin-Aomori has been restored from April 29. 

Now I can introduce this unbelievably reasonable offer for foreign tourists! JR East Pass Special valid until June 30, 2011 allows you to travel throughout East Japan on the JR East Shinkansen trains for 3 days. The price is only 13,000 yen!  FYI, usually I can’t even buy the one way Shinkansen ticket from Shin-Aomori to Tokyo with only 13,000 yen as Japanese….I wish I could be a foreigner until the expiry date of this pass!  Please check the detailed info by clicking the following image.

 

Once you stepped on a ground of Aomori Prefecture, please don’t fail to present your JR East Pass of JR East Pass Special at the designated Tourist Centers to receive nice gifts (for details pls click the following image). Only the first 50 – 500 visitors would be eligible to receive  those gifts. Hope you can make it.

The weather is getting nicer in Aomori, and Japanese tourists start visitng Lake Towada, Lake Juniko and Mt. Hakkoda to  experience lush greenery and fresh air.

I’m currently working at the 8th floor of ASPAM, where you can receive (B)Apple Lanyard at the desk of Aomori Prefecture Tourist Information Center located on the 1st floor of the building. If you ever come to ASPAM, please feel free to visit me :)

Advertisements

Soba Lunch at Samurai House in Goshogawara

Posted in Goshogawara-city with tags , , on April 26, 2010 by Yuko

Do you like Soba (buckwheat noodle)?  Are you interested in old Samurai houses?  Then this restaurant is the place you have to visit in Goshogawara-City where you can kill two birds with one stone.   This attractive soba restaurant was opened 3 years ago, using 120-year-old Samurai house.   Since it was located in the middle of residential area along the back road, I was a bit nervous that I might get lost. Soba flags led me to the gate, but I hesitated to go through the gate because it didn’t look like a restaurant.  

First I was impressed by many tall trees.   Evergreen pine trees symbolize longevity and prosperity, which usually been planted around the samurai houses.   I don’t know a lot about trees, but could tell those trees must be living more than 100 years.

 

The name of this restautant is “Midori-tei”, literally the green residence.  

First you will find the tatami room where beautiful and valuable ornaments are displayed.  By passing through this room you can enter the dining room.                                                                                                                                                                

 

 There are Japanese low tables and also dining tables and chairs.  It’s good you have a choice.  Some foreigners are obviously not comfortable sitting on their heels.

 

Here is Soba with Tempra – 1,780 yen 

 Crispy Tempra – yum!

 This is Cold Soba with Grilled Duck(1,150yen), which actually wasn’t on the menu, but the chef accepted my picky request. Thank you!

Japanese green onions get very sweet when grilled,  ducks and green onion are said to be the perfect match in Japan.

Soba was delicious with a dipping soy-sauce broth not too sweet compare to the average soba broth taste in Aomori.  You might think foods are a bit pricy, but I could tell all ingredients are carefully selected and it’s taking a lot of time to make the soba and broth, and not using any food additives or chemical seasonings.

After enjoying the meal, you can appreciate many beautiful classical objects.

 Sun lights through decorative transom

 I was very surprised to find this framed calligraphy, which proves that the owner of this residence used to have a friendly relations with Sun Wen, a very famous revolutionist and a governor of China.

In spring, summer and fall you can enjoy viewing the beautiful Japanese garden.   I heard all windows facing to the garden will be removed during summer, and you can enjoy fresh air and perfect view from your table.

It was covered with snow when I visited this place, so I’m ready to visit again soon!

I found the website of this restaurant in English.  Some English sentences are not really making sence probably because it was done by the auto translator, but they have beautiful pictures which are worth visiting to know more about this restaurant.

Mrs. Abe, who is a mother of the chef and also a co-owner of this residence can speak English.  She would enjoy talking to you in English and can show you around this great historical Samurai residence.

Midori-tei

 http://midorihoushin.web.fc2.com/

16 Miyoshi Hanokizawa, Goshogawara

Hours:    11:00am – 4:00pm

Closed:   Wednesday

Tachi Neputa Festival in Goshogawara City

Posted in Goshogawara-city with tags , , on September 15, 2009 by Zack
For as long as I have been living in Aomori, people have been urging me to go and see the Tachi Neputa Festival in Goshogawara city. Tachi Neputa is famous for its illuminated three dimensional floats which are made out of paper and painted elaborately, much like the Nebuta Festival in Aomori, but the best thing is the size! The largest floats in the parade are over 20 meters (over 65 feet) tall! In fact, the name Tachi Neputa, (literally standing Neputa) refers to tall-standing composition of the floats.
Tachi Neputa is held every year for 5 days from August 4th to August 8th. It doesn’t matter if it is a weekday or not, the party still goes on! This year I went on the very last day, a popular day because the main floats stand facing one another and a popular Japanese singer from Goshogawara, Ikuzo Yoshi makes an appearance every year at his hometown’s festival on this last day. This year the last day also happened to be on a Saturday, making the festival extra packed with tons of onlookers.
<image1>
This is a bridge in the middle of the city which overs a slightly elevated view, the only catch is you have to wait until the road is closed to traffic and fend for a spot. If crowds aren’t your thing, I definitely recommend getting to Goshogawara earlier in the afternoon if you want to get a great spot. But don’t worry, even if you don’t manage to get a great spot, the major attraction of this festival is so huge that there isn’t really a bad spot in the whole city.
Once the sun has set and 7pm rolls around, fireworks go off signalling the start of the festival which continues for two hours until 9 pm. First the drums and flutes of the parade music begin and numerous floats, first small but gradually getting bigger, come out and make a circuit around downtown Goshogawara city.
If you go to the Hirosaki Neputa festival or the Aomori Nebuta festival you might notice how each festival has its own music and own cheer shouted out by participants. The cheer in the Tachi Neputa is “Yattemare” which means something close to “Go and get ’em!” which harkens back to the combative history of the festival, when fights would break out among competing floats and their members. I think it’s safe to say that Tachi Neputa also has one of the most energetic melodies out of all the festivals in the prefecture.
But back to the floats-this is just a sampling of what you can see:
<image2>
Scenes from Japanese mythology recreated in three amazing dimensions.
<image3>
While not terribly Japanese, it is still very cute nonetheless.
<image4>
And some floats are beautifully painted, making them a pleasure to photograph.
<image5>
Here you can get an idea of how much work goes into constructing a single float, from creating the framework, applying Japanese paper, and painting the paper. But don’t get too impressed just yet… I still haven’t shown you the big momma float!
And here it is…
<image 6>
Yes, it’s really that tall… For reference you can see it towers over the surrounding buildings of several stories in height, and even makes the utility poles seem like blades of grass as these floats galantly parade their way around the city.
<image7>
It’s really amazing to see how massively tall these floats are and how they can be supported by such a small base and moved around by people so gracefully. If you are photographer this is a definite must see festival in Japan. I filled up an 12 gigabyte memory card in just 2 hours!
I definitely recommend anyone visiting Japan during early August to come up and see Goshogawara’s Tachi Neputa Festival, and don’t forget to bring your camera!

For as long as I have been living in Aomori, people have been urging me to go and see the Tachi Neputa Festival in Goshogawara city. Tachi Neputa is famous for its illuminated three dimensional floats which are made out of paper and painted elaborately, much like the Nebuta Festival in Aomori, but the best thing is the size! The largest floats in the parade are over 20 meters (over 65 feet) tall! In fact, the name Tachi Neputa, (literally standing Neputa) refers to tall-standing composition of the floats.

Tachi Neputa is held every year for 5 days from August 4th to August 8th. It doesn’t matter if it is a weekday or not, the party still goes on! This year I went on the very last day, a popular day because the main floats stand facing one another and a popular Japanese singer from Goshogawara, Ikuzo Yoshi makes an appearance every year at his hometown’s festival on this last day. This year the last day also happened to be on a Saturday, making the festival extra packed with tons of onlookers.

Better to get here early so you can find a seat!

Better to get here early so you can find a seat!

This is a bridge in the middle of the city which overs a slightly elevated view, the only catch is you have to wait until the road is closed to traffic and fend for a spot. If crowds aren’t your thing, I definitely recommend getting to Goshogawara earlier in the afternoon if you want to get a great spot. But don’t worry, even if you don’t manage to get a great spot, the major attraction of this festival is so huge that there isn’t really a bad spot in the whole city.

Once the sun has set and 7pm rolls around, fireworks go off signalling the start of the festival which continues for two hours until 9 pm. First the drums and flutes of the parade music begin and numerous floats, first small but gradually getting bigger, come out and make a circuit around downtown Goshogawara city.

If you go to the Hirosaki Neputa festival or the Aomori Nebuta festival you might notice how each festival has its own music and own cheer shouted out by participants. The cheer in the Tachi Neputa is “Yattemare” which means something close to “Go and get ’em!” which harkens back to the combative history of the festival, when fights would break out among competing floats and their members. I think it’s safe to say that Tachi Neputa also has one of the most energetic melodies out of all the festivals in the prefecture.

But back to the floats-this is just a sampling of what you can see:

Scenes from Japanese mythology recreated in three amazing dimensions.

Scenes from Japanese mythology recreated in three amazing dimensions.

Well he isn't Japanese, but he is still very cute nonetheless.

Well he isn't Japanese, but he is still very cute nonetheless.

Some floats are beautifully painted, making them a pleasure to photograph.

Some floats are beautifully painted, making them a pleasure to photograph.

Here you can get an idea of how much work goes into constructing a single float, from creating the framework, applying Japanese paper, and painting the paper.

Here you can get an idea of how much work goes into constructing a single float, from creating the framework, applying Japanese paper, and painting the paper.

But don’t get too impressed just yet… I still haven’t shown you the big momma floats!

And here they are…

tachineputa6

Giants descend on Goshogawara

Yes, it’s really that tall… For reference you can see it towers over the surrounding buildings of several stories in height, and they even make the utility poles seem like blades of grass as these floats galantly parade their way around the city.

Behold the glory!

Behold the glory!

It’s really amazing to see how massively tall these floats are and how they can be supported by such a small base and moved around by people so gracefully. If you are photographer this is a definite must see festival in Japan. I filled up an 12 gigabyte memory card in just 2 hours!

I definitely recommend anyone visiting Japan during early August to come up and see Goshogawara’s Tachi Neputa Festival, and don’t forget to bring your camera, and maybe an extra memory card!